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How to eq the final mix?

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bart_288_1 View Drop Down
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    Posted: 08 Jun 2013 at 5:10pm
Hi:
    I have been using different music softwares for almost 10 years, and Reason was the most useful to me, so I have to say that this is a great and powerfull software, and I am very happy of using it.
    Well, this is my very first time I post in this forum, so I want to tell something about me: I am neither a music engineer or musician, but through a lot of years and a lot of investigations (books and web), I have learnt about this wondefull world.
    Let's go to the point: I have two questions that made me stuck in my compositions:

  1. How to eq the final mix? (I know that I have to avoid a muddy mix, and I have to cut or boost some frequencies, but how can i do it?..... Depending of the instrument, which frequencies do i have to cut or boost?)
  2. How can i eliminate the noise or hum of the condenser mics? ..... Do I have to use another software to do that?


    Thank you a lot. I will be hoping your answers.


                                                     Alex.

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morganlefaye View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morganlefaye Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jun 2013 at 5:26pm
hi ya thanks for post....

are you eqing on the master bus ?
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bart_288_1 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bart_288_1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jun 2013 at 6:02pm
Originally posted by morganlefaye morganlefaye wrote:

hi ya thanks for post....

are you eqing on the master bus ?


Hi:  I am eqing on the main mixer ..... because i want to cut or boost frequencies to make my sound clearer and not muddy. I use the muster bus only for little corrections.
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RobJones View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RobJones Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jun 2013 at 10:26pm
Hey Alex,

As for the EQing question, it's a tricky one to answer as it really depends on the situation. As a hard and fast rule though, take out the frequencies you don't need, or ones that conflict with other instruments. For example, a lot of synth patches, like leads for example, may be very wideband, with lots of harmonics (different frequencies spread across the whole spectrum) - especially when waveforms like sawtooths are involved. As such, using patches like this without EQ tends to make them take over a track! This may be what you want though, if you're making a simple track with just one huge lead sound!

If you use an EQ to decrease a lot of the frequencies, e.g. roll off the bottom end (which makes more room for the kick drum and bassline - so that they're not clouded/buried), and decrease some bands in the middle, like around 1 to 3kHz, then you can make the sound much less dominant, and also change its shape and character to create a unique sound that fits better with other parts. You can also use filters to remove a lot of the frequencies - filters a great because they not only shape the sound and allow you to mix it more easily, also leaving way more room for other sounds, but they can add a human element to a sound too (the mouth is a filter after all!), so make a sound a lot more pleasing on the ear.

I did an EQ topic a while back that you might like to read.....

As for the noise/hum, what mic/interface are you using? You shouldn't have any noise or hum really, so it sounds like a fault or dodgy connection somewhere - could be mains hum? Or maybe I'm not understanding exactly what your problem is?

r
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bart_288_1 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bart_288_1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jun 2013 at 11:19pm
The problem is only for the condenser mic:
    Becasuse of I don't have a studio room, i have to use my own room to record. The problem is that my condenser mic catches all the noise and sounds arround me, and then i have to remove it with another program.

    So the question is: Does Reason have something to remove this noise or how can I remove it?
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morganlefaye View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote morganlefaye Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jun 2013 at 12:09am
depending on the frequency range the interference is.... you could remove most of it with a filter in high or low pass
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RobJones Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jun 2013 at 3:20pm
ah I see. In that case, you need a gate. I teach how to use a gate at the start of the advanced course - it's an audio effect that mutes or drastically lowers the level of a signal in between the loudest parts. So, in other words, when the signal is loud enough, for instance when you speak, sing or make any kind of noise into the mic, the gate stays open and the signal is heard. Then, when you stop making sound into the mic, the gate closes and the signal is muted.

This doesn't get rid of the noise of course, but means it's less noticeable as it isn't consistent and only slightly degrades the voice or instrument that you're recording. Filtering is another way of reducing noise, but this means affecting the frequencies in the voice or instrument - if you roll off the high frequencies to get rid of hiss, you can lose the clarity and brightness in the voice/instrument, and rolling off the bottom could make it too thin sounding. Although the majority of a voice's frequencies lie in the middle of the frequency range, reducing or cutting the frequencies at either extreme still has an effect. So, a gate is generally the way to go.....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bart_288_1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jun 2013 at 4:45pm
Originally posted by RobJones RobJones wrote:

ah I see. In that case, you need a gate. I teach how to use a gate at the start of the advanced course - it's an audio effect that mutes or drastically lowers the level of a signal in between the loudest parts. So, in other words, when the signal is loud enough, for instance when you speak, sing or make any kind of noise into the mic, the gate stays open and the signal is heard. Then, when you stop making sound into the mic, the gate closes and the signal is muted.

This doesn't get rid of the noise of course, but means it's less noticeable as it isn't consistent and only slightly degrades the voice or instrument that you're recording. Filtering is another way of reducing noise, but this means affecting the frequencies in the voice or instrument - if you roll off the high frequencies to get rid of hiss, you can lose the clarity and brightness in the voice/instrument, and rolling off the bottom could make it too thin sounding. Although the majority of a voice's frequencies lie in the middle of the frequency range, reducing or cutting the frequencies at either extreme still has an effect. So, a gate is generally the way to go.....


Thank you, I will use a gate and a low/high pass filter next time.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zhaodandan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Aug 2013 at 8:32am
Many famous and successful Americans had to fail over and over again to achieve what they hoped to in life. Abraham Lincoln failed at war, as a businessman, as a lawyer and even at politics at first. He pushed on through and became president of the United States. Thomas Edison’s teachers called him “stupid” and he was fired multiple times before “failing” 1000 times attempting to invent the lightbulb. Michael Jordan was once cut from his high school basketball team.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ADISDAS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Oct 2013 at 6:59am

Hi Smile,

I am no expert but I can only share what works for me,
For your first question, I do not use any limiting or EQ on the master bus when I finish a project, I make the mix sound as best as I can with around -4db of headroom left to work with when I bounce the track to Adobe audition (you can use anything which displays waveforms nicely, I just happen to like Audition) - I will upload a commercially released track as a reference to see the free curves and where the energy lies within the track then I import my file and equalize to match the reference track as much as I can, Given its the same genre, with similar sounds & instruments as what I’m using. By observing commercially, released tracks this way you will notice the ideal frequency curve for the specific genre you are working with and you will know how yours should look as well, there is a few great VST's for visual monitoring available and many equalizers out there as well. I like Isotope Ozone 5 because it lets me choose the order of my mastering chain and has a nice EQ, it really is an all in one product but you can also use multiple EQ's in your mastering chain. For example, have one for making the track sound over-all smooth and lively where it lacks energy and another EQ for narrow Q precise removals of dominant frequencies, which are too prominent in the mix.


I hope this helps, Again I'm no expert but this is what i find works best for me Embarrassed
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